AND THAT'S ANOTHER STORY...
Stories and Testimonials from Aislingcudo owners


Am CH/Can GCH Aislingcudo Is Caiseal Na Ri - Chester

Aislingcudo Is Caiseal Na Ri - Chester

Chester is out of Canadian CH Shireoak Iced Flame ~ (Bertie) X Canadian CH Aislingcudo Is Naimh Oisin (Naimh).  This happy go-lucky boy has earned many BOB and Group successes including BOB in the Canadian National Specialty 2017.  Thank you, especially to his handler, Chris Downing  who,  in his most recent shows in the US Finger Lakes Wine Country Circuit, steered Chester to a wonderful showing:   BOB at the Elmira Kennel Club Show under Judge Robert Stein, BOB at the Onondaga Kennel Club Show under Judge Charles E. Trotter and BOB at  the Kanadasaga Kennel Club show under Judge Ruth H. Zimmerman.  We are so thankful to the judges who have recognized this boy as an excellent example of the breed.  Chester is a proven stud and a dog with a wonderful, playful temperament.

Proudly owned by Adam and Valerie Saunders.  Co-owned, bred and mentored by Pat and Albrecht Ua Siaghail.

Seamus

It will be a year in August 2017 since we welcomed Seamus into our family. It was unplanned, we just lost our cocker spaniel several weeks before we got and the sudden loss left us in shock and devastated. And I was in a desperate need for a dog in my life, some people need time to heal, I knew that the only way to overcome my grief was another dog... The search was intense and very short. My friend recommended red and white setter, at that time I was not even aware of this breed. I did my research and contacted Pat, we were soon put on a waiting list for one of her 2017 litters.

It was meant to be that 9-months old Seamus became available due to sad circumstances in his original family. When Pat called us to ask whether we would be interested in taking him, there was no hesitation whatsoever. Yes, yes and yes! A few days later we drove to pick him up. I will always remember the beautiful yard with several red and white setters playing and running, one of them our Seamus! He made us laugh when he was hesitant to come and greet us on the wooden deck, it was his first time stepping on wood. A few moments later I was playing fetch with him and after so much grief I felt whole and happy again, thanks to Seamus. His energy, willingness to play and pure joy are contagious. Pat and her wonderful husband Albrecht made us feel welcome and over time I feel we also found good friends, another bonus coming with Seamus.

We drove home for several hours, Seamus, his head on my lap at the back seat of the car, staring at me with those big trusting eyes. I fell in love and keep falling in love every day since. I am lucky to be married to a guy who feels the same, this dog is such a blessing for all of us! As we soon found out, Seamus was already well trained, very obedient and respectful in the house. He has not destroyed a single thing, maybe except for one carpeted stair when he investigated a snag (started by our cat). Somehow he knows what he can and cannot do or take, if he tries something new that he is not allowed, a simple no is enough and he loses interest. He is playful and mischievous as all young dogs are but it is all positive, nothing to complain about whatsoever.

I call Seamus my therapy dog, whenever I am tired or down, I walk or play with him or pet him and in a few moments I am happy again. He makes me laugh, how he still thinks he is a puppy and tries to sit on my lap or on top of me, how he makes funny faces when I tell him he needs to take shower. He is super gentle with our older cat, he sometimes tries to chase her, asking her to play, but she is not interested. Even when she gets annoyed by his kisses and "slaps" him on the nose, he is still very gentle and friendly and just walks away...

There is another surprise in our lives, we never have been to a dog show in our lives before and knew nothing about it. Although our previous cocker spaniels were pure bred too, they were not show dogs. With Seamus I became very interested in IRWS breed and spent hours and hours reading about these wonderful dogs. When Pat asked whether we would like to show Seamus, we agreed. Since my lack of experience, I was not comfortable showing Seamus myself, so Pat put us in touch with Noreena, a professional handler. Seamus is doing great and getting better as he matures, we are so proud of him and thankful to Pat and Noreena for mentoring us. Whenever I need advice, I ask Pat, she is always there, willing to help, we cannot ask for more. We occasionally attend handling classes with Noreena, another good source of advice and help. Thanks to these wonderful ladies, Seamus is doing great in the show ring.

The only thing that worried me a bit in the past was how Seamus did not like to eat kibble. It was a high quality, but even when I added something like chicken to his food, his appetite was up and down. Several weeks ago we switched him to raw food and now we have a dog that cannot wait to get his next meal and keeps asking for more. We were hesitant feeding raw diet, same reasons as most people I guess, fear of bacteria, how to handle raw meat when travelling etc. Noreena helped with these issues and although the price is about 1/3 more than kibble, we have no regrets. I am a convert and of course Seamus is too!

Since our grown up sons will be moving out soon, we started looking for a new property, away from the city, with some space for Seamus to run. And we are already dreaming about adding more IRWS to out family, when we settle down in a new place, at least one and then we will see. For now I started my collection of antique porcelain IRWS figurines, postcards, stamps... I never was a collector of anything but I am so in love with Seamus and this breed that I could not help it. I was always interested in everything Irish, so it all fits together.

Thank you Pat for the love of my life, Seamus! You breed great dogs and I hope to keep learning from you for the years to come.

Jana and Roman, Ottawa




Our first dog was Hunter, a Golden Retriever. After losing him to a heart condition, my husband and I were heart broken. We couldn’t replace him with another Golden, so we began a search on the AKC website. We looked for a breed that was similar in temperament, that would fill the needs of our family: loving, loyal and integral to our family. Through our search, we discovered the Irish Red and White Setter. Further research lead us to Pat and Albrecht in New Hamburg. We made contact and were invited to come and visit a current litter of puppies. After meeting those wiggling little bundles, we were sure that this was the breed for us. Pat and Albrecht were very knowledgeable about the breed, and explained the genealogy to us. Plans were made, we would receive a puppy from the next litter. Enter Milo O’Shay Cowan, who would be the first of our three IRWS from Pat and Albrecht. Milo surpassed our vision: he immediately became the center of our family, and was a wonderful companion to our two young children ages 5 and 7. We had many wonderful years with Milo, always at our side, our loyal friend. After he passed, we took a year to grieve, and found ourselves contacting Pat and Albrecht again. Enter, Quinn, our second male IRWS. In no way did he replace our Milo, but continued our story of Irish Red and Whites. He too, became the center of our family. After two years, we considered another IRWS to be a companion for him. We had never had two dogs, and were treading into the unknown. Enter, Emma, our sweet, loving little girl. She had a personality all of her own and captured out hearts with her long eyelashes. She and Quinn play, sleep, wrestle together. They are very affectionate, well tempered dogs and love human contact. They are very athletic, love to run and jump and chase balls in the yard. Both are high on security alert, and notify us of any birds, squirrels, or people passing by the house, but love to greet our guests. Emma and Quinn are half siblings, and share the same mother. Having two dogs is not twice the work, but twice the love added to our family. Our dogs are very healthy and quite lovely and often garner attention on walks, “What beautiful dogs, and what is the breed?” Every moment of every day our two IRWS Quinn and Emma fill our family with love and joy—our life has been so much richer because of them.




Teena and I first met Pat at an agility class and were struck by how regal, loving and enthusiastic her dogs were. It was our first introduction to the Irish Red and White Setter breed and we fell in love.


A couple of years later we were ready to bring a puppy back into our lives, and we thought immediately of those beautiful setters we met those years ago. We contacted Pat, who remembered us, and she was very thorough in both answering our questions, and asking questions of us, as part of her intentional  way of selecting suitable “puppy people”.

Bradaigh (Brady) came home the day before Christmas Eve and our family could not be more pleased with his breeding, temperament and spirit. After several conversations and visits with Pat, we decided to get into showing our dog for conformation and have enjoyed learning about this whole new world. Pat is always there for encouragement, advice and training, never pushing or pressuring us, only offering support and guidance.

Pat and Albrecht are true experts of the Irish Red and White Setter breed and their passion, knowledge, and attention to detail is a testimony to their professionalism and warmth.

It has been a pleasure to watch Bradaigh grow and mature into a confident, playful and loving family pet. We are grateful that we attended that agility class that introduced us to Pat and her dogs, and would recommend them to any who are seeking to enrich their lives with an Irish Red and White Setter companion.

Dave

Riley   Riley

Pat,
Yes, you may use my letter on your testimonial page.  It's not the most uplifting letter but if it helps just 1 prospective new dog owner grasp the full responsibility that they are about to undertake, then it would be worth sharing!  I might add that the 12 wonderful years that I had with Riley and the wonderful, indelible memories that she left on my soul far out weighed the bad part at the end. 

Sincerely,
Greg


Dear Pat and Albrecht,
I hope that this email finds you both well and thriving!  It has been quite some time since we last spoke but you both have often been in my thoughts.  It is with sadness in my heart and literally tears in my eyes that I write you this day.  On May 21th of this year our Riley went to heaven.  She was very ill and looked to me for that most difficult of decisions to help her on her journey. 
 
She was the best dog I have ever had in my 44 years.  The 12+ years that she was with us were some of the best years of my life.  She was there to approve of Karen as my wife and shared in the birth of our two sons!  She enjoyed riding in the truck, the occasional ice cream cone, and going to the dog “spa” (I finally found a groomer that I could trust with my baby).  She also enjoyed hunting up until a couple of seasons ago.  I think if she had her druthers though, she would have wanted me to be as good of a shot as she was a hunter!  She loved following her nose whose curiosity was only outweighed by her insatiable spirit and personality!  She was a loving dog and divided her down time between sprawling on the leather couch and squeezing onto my lap. 
 
Thank-you both so much for such a wonderful member of our family!  As we take some time to celebrate the life of our Riley, I can’t yet look to life with another yet (even though my oldest, Grayson, hinted at just that earlier as I showed him your website).  I do know that when the time is right, another Irish Red and White Setter will be the only option.
 
Thank-you again,
 
Gregory


Cushla

Rowan is my first Irish Red and White Setter.  He and I are active in agility together, and through that, I began a correspondence with Pat Ua Siaghail.  Rowan’s mother, Rosie, was one of Pat and Albrecht’s puppies.   I began to send Pat video and photos of Rowan running agility because I thought she might like to see what Rosie’s prodigy was accomplishing.
As Rowan matured and continued to accomplish much in agility , I continued to correspond with Pat. She was supportive and excited about Rowan’s accomplishments.   We had many “discussions” about agility and how wonderful and athletic these dogs are. Then one fateful day, Pat posted ultra sound pictures of puppies which were expected from Pat’s gal Bronough .   In one of our e mail correspondences, I randomly asked Pat if all the pups were spoken for.  And that was the beginning of a journey we are still taking together.
Pat asked that I call her to discuss the puppies.  I remember driving home from an agility class with Rowan and stopping at a rest area to talk to Pat on the phone .  Pat knew that I was debating committing to a pup. She was extremely patient.  All my questions were answered. I felt like I had known her my whole life and in reality, it was the first time I ever spoke with Pat directly. When I told her “yes” I wanted a pup, she was very excited. I wondered why, and now I understand.  Pat takes care when placing her puppies. She wants to be sure they are matched to the right owner and go to good homes.  If you want an agility dog, she considers that when placing, and the same for hunting, conformation or pet.
I communicated to Pat that I was very concerned that a pup was being suggested for me without my seeing it. However, there was something about our conversations that were comforting to me. Pat asked what my main concerns were for the new pup. I told Pat that structure came first, as it would be an agility dog, then temperament.   I was comforted by the fact that Pat knew what I wanted to do with my new pup and would select a pup with that in mind.  And she did.
We continued our correspondence through phone conversations, emails etc. I watched the pups grow through photos.  I myself grew more and more excited, but still nervous. Was I making the right decision? Would another dog fit in here? Could I train another dog for agility while still running Rowan? What if the dog was not the right one for me?
In April 2012, my husband and I drove to Canada.  The babies were ready to go. It was a mixed emotion ride to get a pup I had never met. All the questions swarmed through my mind. Yet I couldn’t wait to meet her. I was thrilled at the prospect of getting another pup. Yet I was nervous.
Pat and Albrecht welcomed us like we were long lost friends. Their warmth was tangible!  We met all the puppies, and all the adult dogs in their home.  The puppies and adult dogs live in a home where they are loved and nurtured. Pat, Albrecht, Kevin and I sat together and went about finding the perfect name for our pup. I knew I liked the name Cushla because it meant “heart” or “sweetheart” and Albrecht helped me with the rest….Aislingcudo is Cushla Mo Chroi……. Heart of my heart. 
Pat has been here for me since that first day we spoke on the phone, and continues to be here for me. We have shared many conversations where she has answered all of my crazy questions. No question too inane for her. I have the deepest respect for Pat and Albrecht, these champions and devotees of the breed. It is evident that Pat and Albrecht are intent on keeping the breed healthy and sound. Through Pat, I have learned volumes about these dogs, their history, the nuances of selecting the correct breeding combinations, genetics etc.   Aislingcudo dogs are healthy, sound and happy. They are raised and socialized to perfection.   I adore my Cushla Mo Chroi and am very excited about her progress in the agility world.  She is pure joy to run and train. Pat chose the perfect dog for me. Cushla is beautifully put together, smart, fast, sassy and loving. She is tearing up the agility rings and is going to be a real head turner. Like her “brother” Rowan.
If you are reading this, then you are probably looking for an Irish Red and White Setter, and searching for a quality breeder.  I would say you have found them, and look no further!! 
Thank  you, Pat and Albrecht, from the bottom of my heart for sending Cushla my way. She is everything I dreamed of in an agility dog, but more than that, she is everything I dreamed of for a buddy and companion!! I am so very lucky that our paths have crossed.

- Kathy


Nali

Good morning Pat,
 
Let me bring you up to date on all of the excitement that's taken place in the past 18 hours.
•    I rode all the way home on Karen's lap, and I was exceptionally good. (I didn't see any need to put Karen into the crate.)  You'd have been proud of me.  I only slept part of the way as this first road trip was too exciting.  Although I was concerned about the roads at first, the worst part was just getting back to Hwy. 401.  After that it was fine, with a little snow and a lot of wet.  As we passed through Bright, a big tanker truck carrying goat's milk made a left turn in front of us.  I asked Tom to follow that truck, but he continued through the intersection.  Tom doesn't follow commands very well.
•    We stopped at Sobey's in Tecumseh to buy some goat's milk.  They no longer carry it.  But then we went to Zehr's just down the street and Voila!  They carry it.
•    We completely confused the people at U.S. Customs - like 6 of them.  They assured Tom that there's no problem bringing a puppy from Canada, but when he pointed out that I'm nine weeks old yesterday and that I'd be thirteen weeks old + 1 day when they return from Iceland and showed him the regulation - the agent was flummoxed (didn't know that I knew that word, did you).  They let Tom go into secondary inspection and inside.  He had five more agents confused by the timeline, but a supervisor cleared things up.  A pup can come into the U.S. without having had a rabies shot up until the age of four months.
•    As soon as we got home Tom put papers on the floor for me and I eliminated EVERYTHING.  Then we got around to feeding.  It wasn't as good as yours, but it was filling and I was energized for some playtime.  Fifteen minutes later it was potty time again.
•    Karen and I played on the floor and I investigated the family room area.  Meanwhile, Tom went back to Petco for a larger crate and also brought home a bag of Old Mother Hubbard cookies.  He got the little ones.  Shortly thereafter I stayed in my new crate while he and Karen visited his mother in the hospital.
•    At 10:00 I had my final meal, but didn't quite finish everything.  Instead, I laid down for a nap.  Tom picked me up to go potty, than put me in the crate and carried me upstairs to their bedroom.  I slept soundly until 4:30 a.m. when I started yelping.  Tom took me downstairs to go potty and then brought me back to the crate.  I complained for less than ten minutes and then went back to sleep until 7:15.  It's really peaceful without ten siblings crawling all over you, so I slept in.  Karen and Tom normally get up at 5:30, but I let them sleep in too.
•    We went downstairs to potty again, and then we played on the floor until 8:00.  They made my breakfast and I woofed it down.  Then the three of us played on the floor again.  Tom loves handling me.  I like it when he lays on the floor and I crawl all over him.  It's a long trip walking up his legs from the ankles and all the way to his face.  After fifteen minutes we took another potty break and I eliminated everything again.
•    I'm going to lie down now and take a nap.  Karen is getting ready for church and Tom will go after she gets home.
 
That's it for the first 24 hours.  So far it looks like you picked a new home for me where I'll be loved.  Thank you for everything.  It's been a great nine weeks.  Wishing you and Albrecht all the best.



Love,
Nali


Katie

Enriched by my R&W

My R&W came to me through one of those coincidence we have probably all experienced at times and which suggest the subtle hand of destiny.

For more than 18 years we had a wonderful family dog, a mutt of beagle, cocker-spaniel and blond lab ancestry. After that long and energetic life, now old and tired, she deserved our mercy, the sad realization that comes at some time for every dog owner.

My wife was already ill then. She fought it with courage for another two years but it progressed further. We knew in our hearts that to own and enjoy another dog together would remain a dream forever. Finally, as it sadly still does so many, cancer claimed my wife Brigitte too.  I was numb with grief.

My daughter had the good intuition to buy me the 2004 Dog Annual before she left to return to England. I looked at the pages from time to time, but for many months I felt no energy or drive to enliven my empty home again.

In early summer I began visiting SPCA shelters, but did not find what I was looking for, a dog like the mutt “Tuffy” we owned as a family. At last I realized the futility of my attempt to reach into the past. I also came to the conclusion that I would likely have to get a puppy, although in my situation I preferred a more mature dog.

My fond memories of Bernese Mountain Dogs when growing up in Switzerland led me to look up a number in the Dog Annual of a breeder of such dogs who just happened to live in our town. It turned out to be another bout of nostalgia, the breed was not for me after all.

The outing did, however, point me in the right direction: Getting into my car and driving away, I noticed a couple walking a young, trim and rather long legged dog with floppy ears and a lovely face in which I seemed to detect something of our old family dog. I stopped, got out and chatted with owners. Their dog was a young English field setter, a “Llewellyn” setter they called it, and had been just recently acquired by them from a breeder in the U.S. The more I played with the dog, the more it grew on me. My search through the internet turned up a number of breeders of English field setters in the Dakotas, but after talking to some of them, I had a change of heart.

Back to the “Dog Annual” to recheck for Canadian breeders: No English field setters, but the Irish Red & White pictures by Aislingcudo looked in size what I had in mind, so I e-mailed them to inquire about their setters. Pat Ua Siaghail answered right away and also let me know that, no they do not have any puppies now, but would I settle for a two-year old female looking for a new home and presently at her sister’s in Edmonton? She definitely got me interested now.

Events got into high gear from then on, more correspondence, telephone calls & paper work and finally in July 04, my son and I drove up from Vancouver to Edmonton to meet Theresa and Paul to pick up Katie.

Bonding, at least from my side was as instantaneous as crazy-glue. I think it happened with Katie a few hours later when we camped in the Rocky Mountains and she looked in our tent to us for safety and assurance during one of the worst thunderstorms I had ever experienced in the mountains.

That Katie was brought into my life I consider a blessing and a gift for me and I understand that Pat and her sister are equally pleased that I just happened to contact them when they were looking to re-home Katie. Although she is “only a dog” as some people would say, she has brought life and companionship into my home again and her joyful exuberance is infectious.
 
I am now more willing to accept that life is like a river whose current carries us relentlessly to the sea, only occasionally interrupted by pleasant drifts in back eddies. The river will never be the same as it was once further upstream and there is no way to return to those shores other than by memory. My dog Katie has now joined me on my raft and her presence has already made the journey onward more rewarding and enjoyable again.


- WW
Dea

Generations

As I write this, I have a very active 4 month old Irish Red and White Setter puppy racing around my desk.  Her name is Aislingcudo Mairnéalaigh Dea (Dea).  She is the third generation of a collaboration between Aislingcudo Irish Red and White Setters and Mairnéalaigh Irish Red and White setters.

About 10 years ago, I was researching various sporting breeds, trying to find one that would fit with the Newfoundland and the rescue dog we already had, when I met an IRWS.  This dog was the smartest and most beautiful dog I’d ever met, and I knew immediately that this was the breed I had been looking for. This IRWS was an Aislingcudo dog, and through him I met Pat Ua Siaghail.  After what seemed like forever, in 2003 we got the cutest puppy, named Treasa.

CH Aislingcudo Is Treasa Fionnrua RN (Treasa) became Mairnéalaigh’s foundation.  Treasa is a conformation champion and obedience title holder.  Naturally, you can’t have just one IRWS, so our family grew with the addition of Aislingcudo Is Erin Go Braugh (Quinn).  Then along came Treasa’s puppies, CH Aislingcudo Mairnéalaigh Dis (Duffy) and CH Aislingcudo Mairnéalaigh Una (Orla).  Duffy and Orla are both Canadian and American conformation champions. Both are learning Rally, Obedience, and the finer points of hunting.  Now we have Dea, one of Orla’s puppies.  She too will do lots of activities as she matures.

Through the years, Pat Ua Siaghail has been a constant source of information, support, and help for me.  I am proud to say that she is my mentor and my friend.

Jane
Mairnéalaigh Irish Red & White Setters
Sandy and Tucker

For the love of Tucker

I was introduced to Patricia Ua Siaghail of Aislingcudo under very odd circumstances. I did not obtain one of Pat’s puppies - I sought her expertise in the field of Irish Red and Whites for my dog Tucker (Tuckmans Forrest Gump CD RE CGC - Therapy Dog).

Under the suggestion of the American Kennel Club, I required confirmation from a reputable IRWS breeder that my 6 month old rescue dog was an Irish Red and White Setter. Pat’s confirmation on December 13, 2006 (via a number of photographs that I sent her) was all that AKC needed in order to register my dog for Obedience and Rally competition under their ILP registration (Indefinite Listing Privilege).

Since that day in December, I looked to Pat for advice, ranging from general information on the IRWS (I was a novice to this breed) to basic grooming tips and health related issues. If I had a question, she responded rather quickly. She even made a point to meet my boy twice at the IRWS Nationals in 2009 and 2010.

Unfortunately, an untimely death of my boy at age 6 came too soon. Again, Pat was there to comfort me and provide me words of wisdom.

I value her knowledge of this breed and it’s standards as well as the support and encouragement she gave to me over the years. I am looking forward to trying my hand once again in the obedience ring with an Aislingcudo IRWS puppy.

Tucker's Accomplishments...

Rescue from Plainfield Animal Shelter in Plainfield Illinois

AKC Canine Good Citizen Certification 2006
Therapy Dog International Inc Certification 2007
AKC Companion Dog Title 2007
AKC Rally Novice Title 2007
AKC Rally Advanced Title 2007
AKC Rally Excellence Title 2009

Confirmed as a cancer identifier dog (3 hits) while performing therapy dog work at a local participating hospital in 2008.

First competitive dog in the ring first Irish Red and White Setter National Show in 2009

First Ranking for Rally Obedience by AKC Irish Red and White Setter Parent Club 2010

Earned first leg towards AKC Rally Advanced Excellent title with double first place finishes at IRWS Nationals in 2010.

Earned first leg toward AKC Graduate Novice title December 2010 in addition to competing in AKC Open A (3 non-qualifying scores).

- Sandy

Kane

Kane


In the year 2002 I picked up a book that had just been published called The Essence of Setters by Marsha Hall Brown.  I had owned an Irish Red Setter off and on my entire life.  I was of course, also familiar with the Gordon Setter and the English Setter, but this was the first time I had heard of the Irish Red and White Setter.

I was immediately attracted to this breed after reading Ms. Brown’s accounting of the dog.  The problem was that I compete in obedience (both formal and rally) and some agility and at the time the AKC did not recognize the red and white setter which would not allow me to compete in these venues. 

When the AKC did recognize the breed I went to the first Irish Red and White Setter national to see these beautiful dogs compete in both obedience and the breed ring.  As I was watching the breed ring a gentleman brought a chair up next to me and sat down.  It was obvious to me that he was very familiar with many of the red and whites in the ring and I began to ask him questions which included “how hard is it to find a good red and white puppy?”. 

It turned out that this gentleman was Dr. Albrecht Ua Siaghail.  Albrecht was kind enough to not only answer my questions but introduce me to his wife Pat.  Her dogs were beautiful inside and out and I really liked the relationships she had with her puppy owners.  As busy as she was she took time to talk to me and give me her contact information. 

Since then Pat has spent hours and hours  of her valuable time answering questions and then finally helping me to find my first red and white puppy  ending my 9 year quest to have a red and white in my home.

When a breeding of her bitches in her home did not work out Pat went to bat for me with another breeder who had a litter of her lines and secured a puppy for me from that litter. 

In addition to obedience and agility I also do therapy dog work in a local hospital working with stroke and head/brain injury patients.  From what I have seen of this puppy he will be a wonderful therapy dog. 

He is only 4 months old at this writing but is very  sweet, outgoing, smart, and inquisitive.  I could not have ordered a more perfect puppy.   I am very excited about the potential of this puppy and am indebted to Pat for finding him for me. 

As I have gotten to know Pat over the last two years I can honestly say that I have met few breeders with Pat’s integrity and ethics.  She is extremely knowledgeable about the breed and has the breed’s best interest at heart.  I have come to trust her completely not only as a breeder, but as a friend and look forward to many years of friendship and dogs with Pat.

- R.J.L.  Minnesota
Rosie with bow tie

R
osie's Story

Rosie - Aislingcudo Is Rosin Na Laoi- came home with me to New Jersey in March 2001. I had been looking at the breed for several years and had my heart set on owning one some day. Pat and Albrecht entrusted her to me and our friend grew over the years. Pat has been very supportive and my mentor, for which I am ever grateful.

Rosie and I went back up to Canada to show and she became the first American Irish Red and White Setter to become a CKC Champion. I also finished my two Gordon Setters, who were both AKC Champions. Rosie could spot Grandpop Albrecht sitting up in the stands.

Rosie became the first IRWS to achieve an ARBA - American Rare Breed Assoc. - Master Champion.

Rosie most enjoyed going to AKC Hunt Tests. She was a natural bird finder. Quick to learn and could hold a steady point, she finished her JH in style. Pat was always happy to hear of our new adventures.

Rosie is a great ambassidor of the breed - walking for years in the annual St. Patricks Day parade in Somerville NJ.

Rosie's greatest achievement were her two litters of puppies. We met many new people who have become lifelong friends.

I can always count on Pat to answer any questions and support us.

Pat and Albrecht have always been willing to share their knowledge, history and stories of the Irish Red and White Setter. I was able to meet and talk to many IRWS breeders through the Ua Siaghails. Pat is one of the most dedicated breeders I have had the honor to know. I thank her for her years of support and friendship.

Rosie was a dream come true.

- KP
Baby Cailen

A Dog for All Seasons


A year after my husband and I moved to a rural setting in southern Maine, we had to euthanize our beloved 14-year-old English cocker. Losing him was so difficult that it was over a year before I even contemplated getting another dog.

I was semi-retired and wanted to choose a breed that would fit my new lifestyle—a medium-size dog, non-aggressive, not too energetic, trainable without too much hassle, companionable but not clingy, and with an easy-to-groom coat. I loved setters and the English cocker breeds with their soft eyes, silky hair, and drooping ears, but Chase had needed a lot of grooming to tame the thick “feathers” on his belly and legs, and our new property was next to a wet woodland and surrounded by weeds and burrs. Every run in the woods turned into a combing, clipping nightmare. So, I was paging through one of several books on dog breeds when all of a sudden, there was my perfect dog—a breed I had never heard of before, the Irish Red and White Setter.

I spent some time on the Internet, reading about the red and whites and looking for breeders. When I reached Pat and Albrecht’s site, I instantly fell in love with their stud, Bran, and began exchanging emails with Pat. As it turned out, no litters by Bran were available, but Pat was expecting puppies from her new young stud, Lonan, and promised to determine if one was suited to our household.

So it came to pass that in December of 1999, I flew to Ontario and the next day returned with a Sherpa pet carrier on my lap, containing a tiny red and white puppy. She had decided the best way to deal with the new experience was to curl up and go to sleep. Never made a peep during the entire flight. Every now and then I’d unzip the bag to pet her and tell her how good she was, but she remained in her Zen state. (And to this day, Cailen, as we named her, is a joy to travel with; lies down on her blanket on the back seat and snoozes until I park the car.)

Pat had warned me that young red and whites were energetic, and she was so right. While Cailen had her baby teeth, she wanted to explore and test everything by chewing on it: the cat, her toys, the furniture, the logs by the fireplace, the bricks in the hearth, me!

Although quick to toilet train, she decided her poop was good to eat. I’d never had a dog that mouthed so much and wrote to Pat for advice. “She’s just a baby,” she wrote back. “Wait until her adult teeth come in.” And that’s just what happened. One week the chewing stopped just as if a switch had been thrown, and in all her twelve years, Cailen has never chewed on anything other than her treats and her bones again.

She was still very active, however, and to socialize her and give myself a break, I put her in doggy daycare three times a week. So wonderful to have her return home at the end of the day and fall asleep after supper and a half hour of playtime. By five months, daycare was down to twice a week, and by three years it was over. I was told she was a delight to deal with and was often put in charge of disciplining new puppies because she never got rough—just a hard stare and sharp back to order them to mind their behavior.

As an adult, Cailen became just the right dog for us. She’s enthusiastic about a run by the ocean or through the woods, but is also perfectly happy to lounge around when we’re occupied at home. At first we let her run in a fenced area of the backyard, but as she matured she learned the boundaries of our property and now stays within them, even when chasing a deer from our field! She never wanders off. (I understand this is NOT typical of most setters.)

Her attachment to us may be partly because she was the smallest of her litter and received special attention from Pat and Albrecht. Whatever reason, she likes to keep us close by and even when on a hike or run, always stays within eyesight. We do, however, have to think of her safety whenever we let her off-leash, because she likes to run and pays little attention to cars on the road.

Cailen has done her best to become a useful member of our pack. Her eyes sparkle with intelligence. She’s quick to watch our faces for cues, quick to learn commands, and seeks to please. Since Barry and I obviously don’t hear or smell very well, she has taken on the job of guard dog and barks (never bites or growls) to alert us to human or animal intruders. She gets along well with other dogs and all people. She can tell time and noses me gently if I’m late getting her dinner. Treat time is 7 pm, and if we’re slow, Cailen first tries staring at us, then pulls out her throw (on which we toss the treat), hoping we’ll take the hint. She anticipates our actions by the routine we keep and even the clothes we wear.

She may not be able to speak, but she sure tries to communicate. We love our girl dearly and make every effort to be as gentle and loving to her as she has always been to us.

- Meredith

Jamie

Jamie - first Red & White Setter to earn the IRWSA Trinity Award

We were just looking for a dog to do agility with.  We thought an Irish Red and White Setter would be the perfect addition to our canine family, which consisted of our Irish Setter Teagan.  We were taken aback when Pat offered us the pick male of Pingin and Lonan’s last litter, with the condition that we show the dog in conformation, to earn his Canadian and eventual AKC championships.  Having never set foot in a show ring, we agreed, with trepidation, and so the adventure began.  Pat assured us that it would be fun, that we would enjoy it, and that she would help teach us what we needed to know.  It was not always fun, but she stuck with her part of the bargain, mentoring me, encouraging me, laughing with, and sometimes at, me, and never doubting that Jamie had what it took to succeed.  The road to those two championships took us from coast to coast in the U.S. and across the border, and was paved with many new friendships and experiences and stories to tell.  Jamie took us places we had never imagined, including the Eukanuba Championships.  He put his paws in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, as well as several Great Lakes.  And along the way, he also helped pave the way for the IRWS in agility, rally obedience, hunt tests, and obedience as he earned titles in each, showing those watching the beauty and versatility of the red and white setter.

The relationship we built with Pat along the way went far beyond what would be expected of a responsible breeder looking out for her puppy.  The mutual respect we had from the beginning grew into a good friendship.  She has always been ready with an answer to a question, an encouraging word when I grew frustrated, a laugh, or words of advice.  Many times Pat and I had differing opinions on aspects of Jamie’s feeding, health care, or training strategies.  And Pat will always let you know what she thinks!   Protecting and advocating for her breed and her dogs is always foremost in her priorities. But many times she also stepped back and told me to do what I thought was best.  In addition, as she observed Jamie and me, I saw her own training strategies evolve.  The person who felt that obedience training was at odds with successful showing in conformation was now taking her dogs to not only obedience, but agility classes, and proudly showing me her 4 month old puppy’s “sit”! 

If you decide to get an Aislingcudo dog, you can rest assured that you will get a dog with excellent structure, temperament, and health.  But know that you will also be getting two people along with your dog.  You will get Albrecht, whose lilting Irish voice will regale you with tales of the history of the red and white setter from his vast knowledge of the breed’s history.  He will spoil your dog terribly, if you let him! (I remember one dinner at Pat and Albrecht’s house, where my well-trained obedience dog ended up in his lap at the dinner table!)  And you will get Pat, who will follow up on her pup, and will be available to you for his lifetime, for any mentoring, support, or information you might need, or, if you are as fortunate as we have been, as a lifelong friend. 

- Corlie




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Drs. Pat and Albrecht Ua Siaghail
New Hamburg, Ontario, Canada
Phone: (519) 662-4045   Email: aislingcudo@gmail.com